The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation Supporting closer links between the UK and Japan

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Absence and Ambience by Takashi Kawashima

Takashi Kawashima creates works to suggest ‘absent’ stories, which recount catastrophes caused by overwhelming natural powers, tracing the memory of the land via the imaginary narrative woven by the artist’s own experiences and questions. In the artist’s first UK solo exhibition, Kawashima will present a collection of fragmented stories of catastrophes which happened after the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake. The artist will also exhibit works that examine the uncertainty surrounding us in our daily lives through the motif of ‘shadow’.

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Private View: Reimagining Nature: Hitomi Hosono's Memories in Porcelain

Combining memories of her mother’s garden in Gifu with inspiration found in the parks of London, the work of Hitomi Hosono demonstrates a meticulous study of botanical forms. Hosono makes use of hand-carved models and plaster moulds, to make individual porcelain plant forms that are then applied to vase or bowl forms, enveloping the object’s underlying shape to create an intensely intricate texture that captivates with its delicate beauty.

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Joso's Japan: Nature, Blood and Dust

Novelist Jayne Joso will discuss Japan’s deep affinity with nature, how this permeates traditional everyday life and culture, and how it pulses through the country’s art and literature. She will talk us through the insights she gained into Japan’s relationship with nature as one of a cycle of transmigration, as one that places the human in equal relation, and as one that is for forever fluid, dynamic and ultimately humbling.

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Turning Point: The Momentous Events that Created Modern Japan

To Japan, the arrival of Commodore Perry and his Black Ships in 1853 was almost as shocking as if Martians had landed. In this talk, Lesley Downer will start by setting the scene on the cusp of Perry’s arrival and will tell the story of the Black Ships from both Japanese and American viewpoints. Her talk will be illustrated with contemporary documents and pictures including woodblock prints of Perry and Harris as seen through Japanese eyes, and American drawings of the Japanese.

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Latest news

18 October 2017

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures

Vacancies: Lecturer or Senior Lecturer in Japanese Arts, Cultures and Heritage at SISJAC/UEA

Applications are invited for either of the above posts, which will initially be based in the Sainsbury Institute’s offices in the Cathedral Close, Norwich and later to be based on the UEA campus in the Norwich Research Park when the Institute is relocated within a few years. The successful candidate will strengthen the Institute’s research profile, develop and deliver its new MA teaching

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29 September 2017

Tears and Laughter: Women in Japanese Melodrama at the BFI, 16 October to 29 November 2017

Running at BFI Southbank from Monday 16 October – Wednesday 29 November, Tears and Laughter: Women in Japanese Melodrama will be an opportunity for audiences to explore the cinema of Japan’s ‘Golden Age’, with a distinctly female focus. This Sight & Sound Deep Focus season includes several titles rarely screened in the UK, such as The Mistress (Shirō Toyoda, 1953), An Inlet of Muddy Water (Imai Tadashi, 1953) and The Blue Sky Maiden (Yasuzo Masumura, 1957), and
spotlights the magnificent female actors who starred in them. These include figures such as Setsuko Hara, one of Ozu’s key collaborators, Kinuyo Tanaka, the actor who became one of Japan’s first female directors and who was hailed in the West as ‘Japan’s Bette Davis’, and Machiko Kyō, best known as the star of Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950). All of these stars endure as beloved icons of Japanese cinema, and their performances shine just as brightly as they did over fifty years ago.

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28 September 2017

Gohei Nishikawa London Debut - Special Piano Recital on 14 October

Gohei Nishikawa, a world class pianist who plays only with his seven fingers, will perform in St Lawrence Jewry on 14th October, with a special guest soprano Charlotte de Rothschild. Doors open 6:15PM, concert starts at 7PM. Tickets £20-£25.

Nishikawa, who currently lives in New York City, was a rising young star who performed at the Lincoln Centre and Carnegie Hall. Tragically in 2001, Nishikawa began his battle with Dystonia, neurological disorder which impairs and distorts motor movements. Through years of rehabilitation, he has slowly regained his ability to play with his right hand and the two working fingers on his left hand.

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