News for March 2017

Featured news

16 January 2018

'Do Insects Actually Taste any Good?' by Daiwa Scholarship alumna

Charlotte Payne, a former Daiwa Scholar and Japanese Government (MEXT) Scholar, is a PhD candidate based at the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge. She is investigating the potential impacts of increased consumption of edible insects and  looking at the potential of edible insects to meet the current need for a protein source that is

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15 December 2017

Carl Randall work featured in 'Small is Beautiful' at Flowers Gallery until 6 January 2018

The featured two miniature paintings are included in the group exhibition Small is Beautiful at Flowers Gallery, Cork St. Central London, 14th December 2017 – 6th January 2018. Flowers is one of the UK’s leading commercial galleries, with galleries in New York, Central London and East London, representing prominent British figurative painters such as Peter Howson, Ken

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29 November 2017

Daiwa Foundation funds projects ranging from fish rubbing to neuromuscular disorders

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation has published details of grants awarded to support UK-Japan projects in its latest funding round (September 2017). The Foundation will support artists Eleanor Morgan and Sam Curtis to travel to Japan to enhance their skills in “gyotaku” or fish rubbing, after which they will run workshops in London to encourage people to learn about ocean ecology.

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23 November 2017

JETAA UK Academic Special Interest Group (SIG) University of East Anglia, Norwich, Friday 8 December 2017

For information on attending, submissions of current research, and about potential funding available for accommodation and travel expenses, please contact this year’s convener Simon Kaner, Director of the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia and Head of the Centre for Archaeology and Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute via S.Kaner@uea.ac.uk. There is now a Facebook group called ‘JETAA UK Academic Special Interest Group’; to join, search for it by name via facebook and request permission.

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News

22 March 2017

Terunobu Fujimori's continuing collaboration with Kingston University students

In 2015, the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation awarded a Daiwa Foundation Small Grant to  Mr Takeshi Hayatsu, lecturer at the School of Architecture & Landscape, Kingston University and Director of Hayatsu Architects. Hayatsu invited architect and architectural historian Terunobu Fujimori to London to participate in a round-table event on the theme of contemporary crafts held in a pavilion* to be built by Kingston Architecture students at Dorich House Museum in 2016, under Fujimori’s guidance and supervision.

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22 March 2017

British Association of Japanese Government Scholars - talks in London on 28 March 2017

The British Association of  Japanese Government (MEXT) Scholars (BAMS) will host its second edition of the BAMS Talks on Tuesday 28th March 2017, 18:00 – 20:00 at the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, with a range of topics from civil society to space robotics. All the presentations will be given by former or newly awarded MEXT Scholars and it is completely free or charge to attend!

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22 March 2017

An Evening of Japanese Documentary presented by NHK WORLD TV on 10 April 2017 in London

On Monday 10 April 2017, NHK WORLD TV will screen two documentaries in London:
1. What You Taught Me About My Son, 6.30pm – an award-winning documentary about a
Japanese boy with severe autism and 2. Never-Ending Man: Hayao Miyazaki, 8.30pm – follows Japanese animation maestro and Studio Ghibli co-founder as he comes out of retirement to work on his first-ever CGI film.

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9 March 2017

Collaboration between UCL and Kobe into the Varicella Zoster Virus

Dr Depledge received a Small Grant from the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation that supported a month-long visit to Kobe University where he and Dr Sadaoka were able to further develop their techniques and collaborations. The primary aim of their current project is to explore how VZV latency affects the nerve cells in which they reside.

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