News

Featured news

18 October 2017

Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures

Vacancies: Lecturer or Senior Lecturer in Japanese Arts, Cultures and Heritage at SISJAC/UEA

Applications are invited for either of the above posts, which will initially be based in the Sainsbury Institute’s offices in the Cathedral Close, Norwich and later to be based on the UEA campus in the Norwich Research Park when the Institute is relocated within a few years. The successful candidate will strengthen the Institute’s research profile, develop and deliver its new MA teaching

Read on

29 September 2017

Tears and Laughter: Women in Japanese Melodrama at the BFI, 16 October to 29 November 2017

Running at BFI Southbank from Monday 16 October – Wednesday 29 November, Tears and Laughter: Women in Japanese Melodrama will be an opportunity for audiences to explore the cinema of Japan’s ‘Golden Age’, with a distinctly female focus. This Sight & Sound Deep Focus season includes several titles rarely screened in the UK, such as The Mistress (Shirō Toyoda, 1953), An Inlet of Muddy Water (Imai Tadashi, 1953) and The Blue Sky Maiden (Yasuzo Masumura, 1957), and
spotlights the magnificent female actors who starred in them. These include figures such as Setsuko Hara, one of Ozu’s key collaborators, Kinuyo Tanaka, the actor who became one of Japan’s first female directors and who was hailed in the West as ‘Japan’s Bette Davis’, and Machiko Kyō, best known as the star of Kurosawa’s Rashomon (1950). All of these stars endure as beloved icons of Japanese cinema, and their performances shine just as brightly as they did over fifty years ago.

Read on

28 September 2017

Gohei Nishikawa London Debut - Special Piano Recital on 14 October

Gohei Nishikawa, a world class pianist who plays only with his seven fingers, will perform in St Lawrence Jewry on 14th October, with a special guest soprano Charlotte de Rothschild. Doors open 6:15PM, concert starts at 7PM. Tickets £20-£25.

Nishikawa, who currently lives in New York City, was a rising young star who performed at the Lincoln Centre and Carnegie Hall. Tragically in 2001, Nishikawa began his battle with Dystonia, neurological disorder which impairs and distorts motor movements. Through years of rehabilitation, he has slowly regained his ability to play with his right hand and the two working fingers on his left hand.

Read on

No posts to show

Toggle navigation