Daiwa Foundation Art Prize

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize offers a British artist a first solo show at a gallery in Japan. In addition to an exhibition, the winning artist will be given a period of support and introductions to key individuals and organisations in the Japanese contemporary art world.  The winning artist is also awarded a participation fee of £5000. The triennial prize is open to British artists resident in the UK who have not previously had a solo exhibition in Japan. The Prize is funded by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation and administered by Parker Harris.

The Prize is open to British artists resident in the UK who have neither had nor are planning a solo exhibition in Japan. The Prize is open to artists working in any medium including painting, photography, print, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, installation and moving image.

The 2018 selection panel was:

Richard Cork, Art Critic
Mami Kataoka, Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo
Sueo Mizuma, Director, Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo
Julian Opie, Artist
Jonathan Watkins, Director, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham

Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2018
Winner: Kate Groobey

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is delighted to announce Kate Groobey as the winner of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2018. She is the first woman to win the coveted Prize in the history of the award.

The artist will be invited to exhibit at Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo, Japan in Autumn 2018, awarded a participation fee of £5000, and a period of support and introductions to key individuals and organisations in the Japanese contemporary art world.

Kate Groobey’s paintings are triggered by an interaction, or shared moment; they portray her relationships with the people she encounters, both familiar and new. As such, the works have a strong personal narrative but also convey social stereotypes and emotions or states that everyone can relate to, like the state of Pure Pleasure, the title of the artist’s recent watercolour series. Kate Groobey also performs as the characters in her paintings, bringing them to life with a series of improvised vignettes, for which she makes the costumes, backdrops and music.

Speaking of the inspiration behind her Pure Pleasure series, Kate Groobey said “at LACMA, I stood looking at a Picasso painting called Man and Woman where the male figure is pointing a knife at the woman’s vagina, when a male security guard (laughing) said, “Picasso was a pig!” That encounter stuck with me and as I started to make my Pure Pleasure paintings I turned my attention to an unexplored perspective in the history of painting, that of a woman painting her female lover, woman on woman, with a desiring female gaze. I realised that when we see a female figure in a painting we are only used to seeing the desiring male gaze or self portraits.”

The Prize 2018 was presented at a private awards ceremony on 7 June, by the distinguished selection panel: Richard Cork, Art Critic; Mami Kataoka, Chief Curator, Mori Art Museum, Tokyo; Sueo Mizuma, Director, Mizuma Art Gallery, Tokyo; Julian Opie, Artist, and Jonathan Watkins, Director, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham.

The originality of Kate Groobey’s work is clear to see – it is dynamic, refreshing, life enhancing even. She weaves subtle cultural references into her paintings and vignettes so delicately. I have no doubt that she will benefit enormously from exhibiting, and gaining exposure in Japan.” Jonathan Watkins, Director, Ikon Gallery

New bodies of work by the three shortlisted artists, Kate Groobey, Keith Milow and Mark Neville are currently exhibited at Daiwa Foundation Japan House as part of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize exhibition 2018, which continues until 13 July 2018.

Previous recipients of the Daiwa Foundation Art Prize include Marcus Coates, who was awarded the Prize in 2009 with a resulting solo exhibition at Tomio Koyama Gallery, Tokyo; Haroon Mirza in 2012, whose solo exhibition was held at SCAI THE BATHHOUSE, Tokyo; and Oliver Beer in 2015. Beer’s solo exhibition Life, Death and Tennis opened at Aoyama Meguro Gallery, Tokyo in November 2015 and comprised video and sculptural works exploring the relationship between audio and visual experience.

Notes to Editors:

The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation is a UK charity, established in 1988 with the generous support of Daiwa Securities Co Ltd. Its purpose is to support closer links between Britain and Japan in all fields of activity, including the visual arts. www.dajf.org.uk

Mizuma Art Gallery opened in 1994. Since then it has been presenting artists from Japan and other Asian countries each with a unique voice, whose works aren’t caught up in fleeting trends. Artists such as Aida Makoto, Yamaguchi Akira, Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba and many others have now achieved worldwide recognition. Mizuma also continue to introduce emerging artists to the international art scene. mizuma-art.co.jp

The Daiwa Foundation Art Prize, now in its fourth iteration, offers a British artist a first solo show at a gallery in Japan. In addition to an exhibition, the winning artist will be given a period of support and introductions to key individuals and organisations in the Japanese contemporary art world.  The winning artist is also awarded a participation fee of £5000. The triennial prize is open to British artists resident in the UK who have not previously had a solo exhibition in Japan.  The Prize is funded by the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation and administered by Parker Harris.

Shortlisted artists

Kate Groobey studied at the BFA Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford University (1997-2000) before undertaking an MA in Painting at the Royal College of Art (2008-2010). She has exhibited widely, nationally and internationally, with solo exhibitions at Ofr, Paris; David Lynch Club Silencio, Paris; Edling Fine Art, Los Angeles; Ever Gold Projects, San Francisco and Horton Gallery, New York. Group exhibitions include Bloomberg New Contemporaries at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London; Making Waves: International Contemporary Art from the Saatchi Gallery, Hyatt Regency, London; 100 Painters of Tomorrow, Beers Contemporary, London; SURRREAL, König Galerie, Berlin; and The Classical, Transition Gallery, London.

Keith Milow studied at Camberwell School of Art, 1962-7, and the Royal College of Art 1967-8. In 1971 he exhibited alongside Andy Warhol at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London and has been represented in many major exhibitions including Tate’s Young Contemporaries (1967); Hayward Gallery, Six at the Hayward (1969); The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Homers (1973); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, British Art Now (1980), Tate Liverpool, Modern British Sculpture (1988), Tate, New Acquisitions (1991) and Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, United Enemies: Sculpture in 1960s and 1970s Britain (2011-2). His work is the subject of major public collections across the world.

Mark Neville studied Fine Art at Reading University before completing his MA in Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College, London, and postgraduate studies at Rijksacademie, Amsterdam. Solo exhibitions include London/Pittsburgh, The Multimedia Art Museum of Moscow, Russia; Child’s Play, The Foundling Museum, London; IWM Contemporary: Mark Neville, The Imperial War Museum, London; Deeds Not Words, The Photographers’ Gallery, London and Selected Films at Kunsthaus Essen in Germany. He has also shown in group exhibitions at Fotomusuem, Antwerp; The National Army Museum, London; The Royal Academy Summer Show, London; SK Kultur, Koln, Modern Art Oxford and Tate Britain. In 2012 he was the recipient of The Wellcome Trust Large Arts Award, nominated for the The Pulitzer Prize in 2013 and the The Infinity Award for Fine Art in 2015.

Dates: 8 June – 13 July 2018
Address: The Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation, Daiwa Foundation Japan House, 13/14 Cornwall Terrace (Outer Circle), London NW1 4QP
Open: Mon – Fri, 9.30 – 5.00pm
Tel: 020 7486 4348
Email: office@dajf.org.uk
Website:  www.dajf.org.uk

For press enquiries, please contact Iona Rowland
Tel: 0203 653 0896
Email: iona@parkerharris.co.uk
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Daiwa Foundation Art Prize 2018 winner announcement

2018 runners-up

Keith Milow

Keith Milow studied at Camberwell School of Art, 1962-7, and the Royal College of Art 1967-8. In 1971 he exhibited alongside Andy Warhol at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London and has been represented in many major exhibitions including Tate’s Young Contemporaries (1967); Hayward Gallery, Six at the Hayward (1969); The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Homers (1973); Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, British Art Now (1980), Tate Liverpool, Modern British Sculpture (1988), Tate, New Acquisitions (1991) and Henry Moore Institute, Leeds, United Enemies: Sculpture in 1960s and 1970s Britain (2011-2). His work is the subject of major public collections across the world.

Image: Keith Milow, Titanium, 2015. Courtesy of the artist.

Mark Neville

Mark Neville studied Fine Art at Reading University before completing his MA in Fine Art at Goldsmiths’ College, London, and postgraduate studies at Rijksacademie, Amsterdam. Solo exhibitions include London/Pittsburgh, The Multimedia Art Museum of Moscow, Russia; Child’s Play, The Foundling Museum, London; IWM Contemporary: Mark Neville, The Imperial War Museum, London; Deeds Not Words, The Photographers’ Gallery, London and Selected Films at Kunsthaus Essen in Germany. He has also shown in group exhibitions at Fotomusuem, Antwerp; The National Army Museum, London; The Royal Academy Summer Show, London; SK Kultur, Koln, Modern Art Oxford and Tate Britain. In 2012 he was the recipient of The Wellcome Trust Large Arts Award, nominated for the The Pulitzer Prize in 2013 and the The Infinity Award for Fine Art in 2015.

Image: Mark Neville, Lashkar Gah Girls School,1, 2011. Courtesy of the artist.

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